Wednesday with Montaigne

Michel de Montaigne, French philospher (28 February 1533 – 13 September 1592)
Wrote essays about his life speaking frankly about man’s insecurities of intellect, body and how one perceives the judgement of others.
Had an arranged marriage.
Lived in a chateau and began writing his essays at the age of 38 in a library of 1500 volumes at the top of a tower. That tower still stands today. 44.8783° N, 0.0300° E

The Essays of Montaigne are to be read time and again. On each reading you will see something new or find relevance to a part of your life that you may not have noticed on your first time reading through.

You can chose to read Montaigne electronically for free thanks to the Gutenberg Project here or go and buy a paperback to thumb through. You can jump in anywhere in the book. Enjoy talking to an old friend or find him as a new one.

Montaigne Quotes:

  • Stubborn and ardent clinging to one’s opinion is the best proof of stupidity.
  • I prefer the company of peasants because they have not been educated sufficiently to reason incorrectly.
  • The value of life lies not in the length of days, but in the use we make of them… Whether you find satisfaction in life depends not on your tale of years, but on your will.
  • If there is such a thing as a good marriage, it is because it resembles friendship rather than love.
  • Of all our infirmities, the most savage is to despise our being.

MUSIC:
Jimi Hendrix – All Along The Watchtower

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One thought on “Wednesday with Montaigne

  1. Pingback: Montaigne on Self-Esteem – Philosophy: A Guide to Happiness | mostly music

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